Review: Prisoners of Geography by Tim Marshall

I heard about this book from a friend who wanted my opinion on the idea of geography impacting on politics, particularly around Africa. I jumped at the opportunity as geo-politics was one of the theories underpinning my thesis which looked at why Britain and South Africa went to war in East Africa in the Great War. The war didn’t feature too much in terms of Africa, although there was mention of the boundaries having stayed relatively static from before the war.
This is an informative book and Tim has covered a huge amount of ground – geographically, politically and over swathes of time. It’s quite an accomplishment and reflective of the ‘hot’ areas. Those territories which are most volatile and which have the potential to impact on the greater part of the world get the most attention, so it’s not surprising that Africa is covered in fewer pages than most other areas. It’s not a case of discriminating against Africa, it’s what the geography dictates.
There were a couple of eye-brow raising moments, most notably around the Artic and the consequences of the melting ice packs. Linked to this surprisingly is Bangladesh and the fact that it could be drowned. My geography was clearly challenged and corrected on a number of occasions – and that was without looking at the maps. Having had the discussion on the book, my friend thought the maps quite accurate – I can’t comment as I don’t tend to ‘do’ maps, I can spend hours trying to work out relationships and other quirks to the benefit of no one or thing other than time-wasting.
Comparing what was written about South America and South Africa, I wonder what led to the difference in approach to the plateau? – was it the Boers’ complete desire for independence which drove them up the escarpment while there was no such impetus in Brazil? The discovery of diamonds and gold consolidating the movement inland.
It could be a worthwhile book to read for those considering changing country – I recall being taught at school that it wouldn’t be wise to move to Belgium or Poland as those two countries are always invaded in a regional conflict. Prisoners of Geography bears this out.
I wonder how military strategy colleagues would use the theories suggested by Tim in interpreting the direction of battle and skirmishes…

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